Add "Drama" using Photoshop

Two Minute Tip

|, Blog, Photoshop, Tips & Tricks, Training & Tutorials, Tutorials, Video Tutorials, Videos|Two Minute Tip: Add “Drama” using Photoshop

Two Minute Tip: Add “Drama” using Photoshop

By | 2017-12-05T10:34:30+00:00 January 11th, 2010|8 Comments

Two Minute Tip – Add “Drama” using Photoshop from Nicole Young on Vimeo.
Here’s another “Two Minute Tip” on how to add a dramatic “punch” to your images using Photoshop.

About the Author:

My name is Nicole and I’m a photographer, author, & educator living in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. When I’m not making photos I’m writing books and tutorials for my online store, Learn more about me and my story here.

8 Comments

  1. uberVU - social comments January 11, 2010 at 10:00 am - Reply

    Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by nicolesy: New video tutorial on NicolesyBlog.com – “Two Minute Tip: Add Drama using Photoshop” http://bit.ly/8khHhC

  2. Peter Lyons January 11, 2010 at 1:18 pm - Reply

    Hadn’t seen that one before. Thanks Nicole!

  3. vetguy January 11, 2010 at 2:05 pm - Reply

    Nice tip Nicole. Even I can do this one.

  4. Diane January 15, 2010 at 5:16 pm - Reply

    I love these short Photoshop tips! Thanks so much for making these :)

  5. Scott January 18, 2010 at 6:25 am - Reply

    Ha! I was just thinking about your original video of your husband smoking a cigar last night. I’ve been meaning to watch it again! Thanks, Nicole!

    P.S. I love it when you’re on TWIP! Tell Frederick to have you on more often.

    P.S.S. I had issues with your CAPTCHA. It displayed FEN3, but the audio said M47U.

  6. […] The image above is the photo straight out-of-the-camera (left) and edited version (right). It was photographed with window-light on the right and a large silver reflector on the left to fill in shadows. My editing on this was very simple: I corrected the white-balance in Adobe Lightroom (from the RAW file), then used a levels adjustment layer for the tones, a separate levels layer for color, and added a reduced-opacity B&W overlay layer to add some contrast (you can learn how to do that last step here). […]

  7. Ron January 27, 2010 at 1:45 pm - Reply

    I use a similar technique where I just duplicate a layer and switch to overlay. Then I use a layer mask to create a vignette with the gradient tool.

    This has an interesting subtlety to it.

  8. […] The image above is the photo straight out-of-the-camera (left) and edited version (right). It was photographed with window-light on the right and a large silver reflector on the left to fill in shadows. My editing on this was very simple: I corrected the white-balance in Adobe Lightroom (from the RAW file), then used a levels adjustment layer for the tones, a separate levels layer for color, and added a reduced-opacity B&W overlay layer to add some contrast (you can learn how to do that last step here). […]

Leave a Reply

Free Photography eBook: Light Stories II

Free Photography eBook

Get inspired with Nicole's eBook: Light Stories II. Sign up below for instant download!

You have Successfully Subscribed!