Two Minute Tip: Add “Drama” using Photoshop

||, Videos|Two Minute Tip: Add “Drama” using Photoshop

Two Minute Tip: Add “Drama” using Photoshop

By |2018-07-08T05:03:41+00:00January 11th, 2010|Categories: Tutorials, Videos|Tags: , |8 Comments

Here’s another “Two Minute Tip” on how to add a dramatic “punch” to your images using Photoshop.

Watch the Video

About the Author:

Nicole S. Young is a professional photographer and published author whose love of photography and teaching has grown into an online business where she creates training materials and resources for other photographers. Nicole is best known for her books on food photography, but is widely versed in a variety of photographic genres, including landscape, travel, lifestyle, and even underwater photography. You can learn more about Nicole's work on her website, nicolesy.com.

8 Comments

  1. uberVU - social comments January 11, 2010 at 10:00 am - Reply

    Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by nicolesy: New video tutorial on NicolesyBlog.com – “Two Minute Tip: Add Drama using Photoshop” http://bit.ly/8khHhC

  2. Peter Lyons January 11, 2010 at 1:18 pm - Reply

    Hadn’t seen that one before. Thanks Nicole!

  3. vetguy January 11, 2010 at 2:05 pm - Reply

    Nice tip Nicole. Even I can do this one.

  4. Diane January 15, 2010 at 5:16 pm - Reply

    I love these short Photoshop tips! Thanks so much for making these :)

  5. Scott January 18, 2010 at 6:25 am - Reply

    Ha! I was just thinking about your original video of your husband smoking a cigar last night. I’ve been meaning to watch it again! Thanks, Nicole!

    P.S. I love it when you’re on TWIP! Tell Frederick to have you on more often.

    P.S.S. I had issues with your CAPTCHA. It displayed FEN3, but the audio said M47U.

  6. […] The image above is the photo straight out-of-the-camera (left) and edited version (right). It was photographed with window-light on the right and a large silver reflector on the left to fill in shadows. My editing on this was very simple: I corrected the white-balance in Adobe Lightroom (from the RAW file), then used a levels adjustment layer for the tones, a separate levels layer for color, and added a reduced-opacity B&W overlay layer to add some contrast (you can learn how to do that last step here). […]

  7. Ron January 27, 2010 at 1:45 pm - Reply

    I use a similar technique where I just duplicate a layer and switch to overlay. Then I use a layer mask to create a vignette with the gradient tool.

    This has an interesting subtlety to it.

  8. […] The image above is the photo straight out-of-the-camera (left) and edited version (right). It was photographed with window-light on the right and a large silver reflector on the left to fill in shadows. My editing on this was very simple: I corrected the white-balance in Adobe Lightroom (from the RAW file), then used a levels adjustment layer for the tones, a separate levels layer for color, and added a reduced-opacity B&W overlay layer to add some contrast (you can learn how to do that last step here). […]

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